30 January 2013

ELEVATOR TO HELL Backwards May 7 inch 1996

Thanks to Jenz

Tracklist

A1
Backwards May
A2
Analysis 1377
B
Backteeth

STARMARKET A Million Words 7 inch 1998


Thanks to Jenz 

Tracklist


A1
A Million Words
B1
Riot Nrrrd
B2
Last Call For Fun

GREN Camp Grenada 1995

by request
 

a rather scathing review

[+] by Pemberton Roach
An often mind-numbingly pedestrian slice of mid-'90s alternative rock, Camp Grenada is energetically performed but ultimately completely forgettable. Produced by Fort Apache Studios alum Tim O'Heir (Sebadoh, Buffalo Tom), the album features O'Heir's usual flair for wonderfully trashy guitar sounds and snappy, in-your-face sonics. Unfortunately, the record's aural excellence can't mask the fact that there's nary a hook to be found. On track after track (after track), Gren employs the Nirvana-approved loud/soft/loud arranging technique, but forgets to include the other essential elements that made the Seattle threesome so monumental: pop songwriting instincts and genuine passion. There are occasional glimmers of life when the band gets a little more outside, like on the slightly Shudder to Think-ish "Go Figure," but these are few and far between. Though the group does sound like it's probably a lot of fun live (there are a few pretty blistering moments of Bob Mould-style guitar meltdown scattered throughout), the record simply doesn't go anywhere. In the end, Camp Grenada is perhaps most valuable as one of the best representations of an era when major labels were snapping up any "alternative" rock band with decent connections and the right hair.
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CARNIVAL ART Holy Smokes 1992

by request
 

biography

by Michael Sutton
The slightly bent guitar rock of L.A.'s Carnival Art took its lessons from the demented Pixies. Consisting of Michael P. Tak (vocals, guitar), Ed (guitar, vocals), Brian Bell (bass, vocals), and Keith Fallis (drums), Carnival Art released their debut LP, Thrumdrone, in 1991. Signed to Beggars Banquet, Carnival Art weren't heavy metal enough to jump on the grunge bandwagon in the early ‘90s, and they were too weird to for pop audiences; caught in limbo, the band recorded two albums of off-kilter alternative music that were ignored and then faded into obscurity. Carnival Art broke up soon after their second full-length, Welcome to Vas Llegas, and a subsequent EP, Blue Food and Black Sparks. A cover of "Cold Ethyl" appeared on an Alice Cooper tribute CD a year later, but Bell had already formed his own group, the Spacetwins, by then; he later joined Weezer. In 1994, Tak recorded Pretty Little Lonely as Michael Petak.
 

CIRCUS LUPUS Super Genius 1992

by request


Tracklist 

1 Unrequited
2 Cyclone Billy
3 Pacifier
4 Breaking Point
5 Straight Through The Heart
6 Marbles
7 Mean Hot & Blessed
8 Cat Kicking Jerk
9 Blue Baby
10 Amish Blessing
11 Pulp
12 Tightrope Walker
13 Chinese Nitro

28 January 2013

SEMI-GLOSS The Falling Kind 2000

by request
 

Tracklist

1
Stephanie's Boy 3:05
2
First We Kissed 4:28
3
Caroline 4:31
4
The Falling Kind 4:48
5
Ieri E Oggi 3:13
6
Passerby 3:20
7
Playground 2:59
8
Tiny 3:58
9
Baby's Changed 4:16
10
Careless 5:18
11
Brand New Day 5:10

CIRCUS LUPUS Solid Brass 1993

by request


biography

[+] by Ned Raggett

Circus Lupus was one of the many intelligent, fierce punk and punk-inspired groups signed to Washington's legendary Dischord label. Ironically, though, the band initially got its start in Madison, WI, where singer Chris Thomson had come to from D.C. to attend college. There he met drummer Arika Casebolt, guitarist Chris Hamley, and bassist Reg Schrader, releasing an initial single and doing various tours. A relocation to Washington was accompanied by a switch in bassists, with Seth Lorinczi taking over that spot. The resultant lineup recorded two albums, 1991's Super Genius and 1993's Solid Brass, along with the Joan Jett-produced "Pop Man" single and some other tracks before splintering thereafter. Hamley and Thomson stuck together, though, going on to form the Monorchid some years later.
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Tracklist  

1 Right Turn Clyde
2 7 X 4 X 1
3 I Always Thought You Were An Asshole
4 And You Won
5 New Cop Car
6 Texas Minute
7 Deviant Gesture Catalog
8 Takes About An Hour: Epilepsy
9 Pop Man
10 Heathen
11 Pop Man
12 Pressure Point
 

GREG GINN

Getting Even
1993
 

Tracklist


I've Changed 1:25

Kill Burn Fluff 2:04

You Drive Me Crazy 3:40

Pig Mf 1:33

Hard Thing 3:05

Pay Day 1:24

Nightmares 2:37

Torn 2:26

Pf Flyer 1:18

I Can't Wait 2:31

Short Fuse 1:58

Not That Simple 1:30

Yes Officer 2:25

Crawling Inside 3:06
 

Payday 
1993
 
by request

Tracklist


Payday (Remix) 3:51

Payday (Original Mix) 1:25

Pig MF 1:36



GREG GINN Dick 1993

by request

Tracklist


Never Change, Baby 0:37

I Want To Believe 3:20

You Wanted It 2:23

I Won't Give In 2:40

Creeps 0:45

Strong Violent Type 2:34

Don't Tell Me 2:58

You Dirty Rat 4:43

Disgusting Reference 0:31

Walking Away 1:21

Ignorant Order 1:03

Slow Fuse 5:08

You're Going To Get It 3:22

SEASON TO RISK The Shattering 2001

by request
 

Tracklist

1
The Shattering
2
Ace Of Space
3
National Gomorrah
4
Spasser
5
Deserve
6
Despair
7
Demand
8
Or Highwater
9
Straight And Narrow
10
Mono Fuego
11
Last Breath Aboard
12
Cease To Exist
 


27 January 2013

GREG GINN Let It Burn (Because I Don't Live There Anymore) 1994

by request
 

biography

[+] by Greg Prato
Unquestionably, the most influential guitarist to emerge from the late-'70s/early-'80s U.S. hardcore/punk movement was Black Flag's Greg Ginn. Never afraid to incorporate other musical styles into this playing (namely jazz fusion and Black Sabbathy heavy metal) as well as squealing feedback from his amplifier, Ginn's playing also served as a major ingredient to the Black Flag sound as he was the only original member to remain in the group from its formation until its demise. Influenced equally by the Grateful Dead and the Stooges, Ginn formed Black Flag in 1977, but the group didn't really start to make a name for itself until Ginn set up shop in Hermosa Beach, CA, in early 1979, where he began running an electronics supply business. It was during this time that the phrase "SST" was coined (an abbreviation for Solid State Transmitter), which would eventually be used for the name of Black Flag's record label. Although members came and went at a steady rate (including singers Keith Morris, Ron Reyes, and Dez Cadena), Black Flag prevailed, building a large and loyal following on the strength of their explosive live show, EPs/singles (including such classics as Nervous Breakdown and Jealous Again), and an appearance in the cult classic L.A. punk documentary The Decline of Western Civilization. Ginn also began to favor a Plexiglas "Dan Armstrong" guitar, which would soon become a trademark of sorts for both him and the band (despite eventually becoming covered with black tape). Black Flag began to make a nationwide impact when big-time Flag fan Henry Rollins signed on as the group's fourth vocalist, which resulted in the group's first-ever full-length album, 1981's Damaged, considered by many as one of the greatest hardcore albums of all time. Although legal red tape would keep Black Flag from issuing a follow-up as quickly as they would have liked (which included Ginn being sent to jail for five days), the band returned more ferocious then ever, with such releases as My War and In My Head, among others. Black Flag also managed to issue a completely instrumental release, Process of Weeding Out, which inspired Ginn to launch his own instrumental project, Gone, resulting in a pair of releases around this time as well, Let's Get Real, Real Gone for a Change, and Gone II - But Never Too Gone. Additionally, Ginn launched another side project around this time, October Faction, which included contributions from many other SST artists. Black Flag broke up after a final U.S. tour in 1986, and while many assumed that Ginn would simply play with Gone full-time, he decided to focus on record company work, forming an all new label, Cruz, while running the Minutemen's former label, New Alliance, as well as SST. The early '90s saw Ginn return from his exile as he began issuing solo albums, including such titles as Getting Even, Payday, Dick, and Let It Burn, as well as surprisingly relaunching Gone. Ginn has also performed alongside other acts (Mojack, Hor, Killer Tweaker Bees, etc.), briefly operated a coffeehouse, The Idea Room, and has been known to appear under an alias, Poindexter Stewart, on his own radio program, Screw Radio. In 2003, Ginn put together a new version of Black Flag (he and Cadena were the only recognizable names) to perform benefit shows for several different cat rescues. Ginn moved to Taylor, TX in 2004 and created a new instrumental band called the Texas Corrugators; he played everything but drums -- handled by Steve DeLollis. They recorded two albums, Bent Edge in 2007 and Goof Off Experts in 2008. (Live outings included different personnel, with Ginn on bass and guitar, with guitarist Gary Piazza and New Monsoon's Sean Hutchinson on drums.) Ginn describes their live sets as being 100 percent live improvisation incorporating rock, jazz, Latin, psychedelia, and country. In 2010 he changed the name of the band to the Taylor Texas Corrugators and released the album Legends of Williamson County on SST.
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